Sustainable by design 2050

An initiative of the UIA

Velux model home 2020

Activehouse

Sapienza_Universit___di_Roma

Architekturclips

Wall House

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House

Photographer: Christobal Palma

Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Wall House
Architect
FAR frohn&rojas, Marc Frohn & Mario Rojas Toledo
Engineers/Specialists
Ingewag Ltda. Ing. Mario Wagner / Wood structural planning, Ing. Ernesto Villalón - Concrete / Concrete structural planning, Serclima Vaillant Building Technology / Heating, sanitary planing, Juan Puentes / Electric project
Location
The Americas - Chile - Santiago de Chile
Climate Zone
mediterranean
Design status
build
Date of completion
2006
Type
Housing
Site area (m²)
5800
Footprint (m²)
351
GFA (m²)
230
NFA (m²)
190
NFA/GFA
0.826
Density
0.04
Gross Volume (GV) (m³)
770
Building Costs
134550 EUR
Building Costs / m² GFA
585
Building Costs / m² NFA
708.158
Building Costs / m³ GV
174.74
Use of renewable ressources - low tech
natural cross ventilation, use of high thermal mass, others
Use of renewable ressources - high tech
heating pump, thermal building mass activation
Renewable, recycled, recyclable and innovative materials

With its separated wall layers the project unites architectural and energy concepts. They become inseparable as in between the different membranes a series of specific climate zones emerges. Thus the individual wall layers do not only build upon one another geometrically, starting from an extruded concrete core developing into a diamond-shaped soft skin, but in the context of the energy concept establish a finely calibrated hierarchy amongst one another.

The concrete core and the ground floor concrete slab contain the gas-powered radiant heating. The ground floor is being climatized from the slab, while the concrete core is radiating heat into the openly organized second floor space. For that purpose PEX-hoses are integrated into the concrete elements. During the summer the circuit can be appropriated for passive cooling using a heat pump. In this case the water in the PEX-serpentines is being cooled down to 15 degree Celcius. The component cooling needs far less energy than conventional air conditioning systems.


Milky Shell, the translucent / transparent climate envelope wraps itself around all sides of the "interior space" of the house. The envelope consists of extruded, multi-layered polycarbonate panels (40mm, 3 chambers, 1,65 W/m²K) and double glazing (1,4 W/m²K). Two surfaces of the envelope are fully glazed. They contain full-height sliding doors, which - depending on daytime and season - allow a complete opening toward the exterior. On both sides of the ridge there is a long pivot-hung element that can be opened in the summer.

The outer skin of the Wall House, Soft Skin, consists of two different woven textiles, the energy screen and an insect membrane. Both materials are commonly used in green house construction. The energy screen consists of a combination of highly reflective aluminum strips, which are woven together with polymer fibers. The diamond-shaped skin uses - depending on directional orientation - energy screen that reflects between 50 and 75% of the sunlight away from the building.

Key Sustainability aspects
renewable building materials, innovative bulding materials, low cost design
Sustainability rated
No
Social and ethical responsibility

The project carefully combines local construction knowledge and at the same time introduces few imported materials (polycarbon¬ate & energy screen), which were selected for their environmental performance. Those have all be detailed in a "do-it-yourself" way for the mostly untrained local labor force to be integrated into the construction process.
Large parts of the lot, which in the past has been a mangel field, has been left untouched and is still harvested from. In the shade of the tent, too, this garden continues.

Ressource efficiency and environmental impact

On the one hand the layering logic unites architectural and envi¬ronmental concept, allowing a series of different "climate zones" to emerge. At the same time they are carefully adjusted to both the production economy of mostly untrained local labor and the very tight budget: while the innermost zones contain the most demanding functions associated with home, the selection of materials and finishes is allowed to ‘roughen up' toward the exterior. Moving from room to room plays with a perception of moving deeper into or further out, with chang¬es of materiality and lighting providing a range of qualitative experi¬ences and cues.

Contextual performance and impact

Wall House is a residence in the semi-rural surroundings of San¬tiago de Chile, a rapidly developing hybrid of suburbia and agricul¬tural hinterland. The large, open lots, each isolated by tall hedges and rows of trees urged us to develop a new form of inhabiting this landscape by understanding the hedges as the outermost wall of the house and the whole lot as the most open architectural space in a sequence of rooms gradually opening up from inside out. The result is a structure, half house, half tent, characterized by a series of four delaminated wall-layers in between which the different inhabitable spaces of the house slip, creating a gradual transition between interior and exterior opening the view to the distant mountains of the Andes.