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Primary School in Gando

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Primary School in Gando

Photographer: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Architect
Diébédo Francis Kéré
Location
Africa - Burkina Faso - Gando, Province Tenkodogo
Climate Zone
arid
Design status
build
Date of completion
2000
Type
Education
Site area (m²)
526
Footprint (m²)
526
GFA (m²)
219
Density
0.416
Gross Volume (GV) (m³)
657
Building Costs
35000 EUR
Building Costs / m² GFA
159.817
Building Costs / m³ GV
53.272
Use of renewable ressources - low tech
natural cross ventilation, evapoartive cooling, use of high thermal mass, others
Renewable, recycled, recyclable and innovative materials

use of local material clay for compressed earth blocks

Key Sustainability aspects
vernacular building strategies, public spaces, accessability for disabled, renewable building materials, ecological building materials, innovative bulding materials, integrated planning process, participation of users in planning process, low cost design, zero energy design
Sustainability rated
No
Social and ethical responsibility

In a country where only half the primary-school-aged children receive an education, this school provides a necessary facility for the residents of Gando, a small village of 3,000 people. While still an architecture student in Berlin, Kéré, the first person in his village to study abroad, raised private money and government support to replace Gando's existing dark and crumbling school. The new building forms part of a larger complex which includes teachers' housing, a well, allotments and a sports field.

Ressource efficiency and environmental impact

The building and materials are perfectly adapted to both local climate and economic conditions. A large oversailing roof unites three linearly arranged classrooms. Covered outdoor teaching and play spaces sit between the classrooms. Walls and ceiling are constructed of locally made earth blocks, the ceiling supported on reinforcement bars. These provide thermal mass and reduce temperature fluctuation.
The roof shades the facades and protects the rammed earth from rain. Cooling air is allowed to flow between the roof and the classroom ceilings. The floor is made of beaten earth. Metal shutters can be opened in various configurations to admit light and air through large windows. Timber, difficult to obtain and subject to termite attack, was hardly used. Villagers were involved in every aspect of the school's construction. Training programmes provided instruction in making clay blocks, local smiths fabricated the roof and shutters, children helped move stones and women helped carry water from several kilometres away.