Sustainable by design 2050

An initiative of the UIA

Velux model home 2020

Activehouse

Sapienza_Universit___di_Roma

Architekturclips

LAKESIDE HOUSE

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: Maija Luutonen

LAKESIDE HOUSE
LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: by Nene Tsuboi

LAKESIDE HOUSE
LAKESIDE HOUSE

Photographer: by Nene Tsuboi

Architect
Tuomas Toivonen
Engineers/Specialists
Jarmo Haapiainen (chief carpenter), Matti Terho (structural engineer)
Location
Western Europe - Finland
Climate Zone
temperate
Design status
build
Date of completion
2007
Type
Housing
Footprint (m²)
136
GFA (m²)
136
NFA (m²)
124
NFA/GFA
0.912
Gross Volume (GV) (m³)
400
Building Costs
140000 EUR
Building Costs / m² GFA
1029.412
Building Costs / m² NFA
1129.032
Building Costs / m³ GV
350
Cooling / Heating-System

geothermal, firewood

Use of renewable ressources - low tech
natural cross ventilation
Use of renewable ressources - high tech
heating pump, geothermal energy use
Key Sustainability aspects
vernacular building strategies, accessability for disabled, renewable building materials, recycling and reuse, ecological building materials, integrated planning process, participation of users in planning process, low cost design
Sustainability rated
No
Social and ethical responsibility

local builder, local knowhow, local materials - self-built; no main site drawing set, on site detail decision

Ressource efficiency and environmental impact

recycled paper insulation; local wood

Economic lifecycle perfomance

The house was built by a local builder-carpenter, who lives on the shores of the neighbouring lake. He often came to work on site by boat. The building materials are simple and inexpensive, and mostly bought from local hardware store and sawmill. The house is situated so that the impact of building activity on the delicate rocky landscape would remain minimal. There is a very small sauna by the waterside, built with timber brought to the site by boat (the sauna is not pictured in these photos). The house is winter-warm and complies with the finnish code for year-around buildings, it is insulated with recycled cellulose has geothermal heating. The building was completed within a tight schedule (8 months) and very moderate budget. The large central space warms quickly when the wood-burning stove is lit, as all rooms are centered around it.

Contextual performance and impact

The site is in Saimaa, the Finnish lake district. A rocky west-facing slope, growing pine, juniper, moss, lichen and blueberries, descends to the vast lake. The house is designed as a place to meet and spend time together for a multigenerational family. The plan investigates how architecture can be actively used by the inhabitants to moderate between a collective experience and individual privacy. All specific, functional spaces are compact, and gathered around a large living room that opens to the magnificent lake view. The sleeping alcoves and bedroom are intimate spaces that can be closed or opened to the common central space with simple revolving and sliding walls. The building's interiors are white, leaving room for the changing light and colours of the day, seasons and landscape.