Sustainable by design 2050

An initiative of the UIA

Velux model home 2020

Activehouse

Sapienza_Universit___di_Roma

Architekturclips

Home for life

Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Home for life
Architect
Aart Architects
Engineers/Specialists
Esbensen Consulting Engineers
Location
Western Europe - Denmark - Aarhus
Climate Zone
temperate
Design status
build
Date of completion
2008
Type
Housing
Footprint (m²)
108
GFA (m²)
180
Gross Volume (GV) (m³)
384
Building Costs
600000 EUR
Building Costs / m² GFA
3333.333
Building Costs / m³ GV
1562.5
Primary Energy (kWh/m²a)
-21
Heating Energy (kWh/m²a)
15
Cooling / Heating-System

Heat pump. Producer Sonnenkraft/Danfoss. Type: Solarcomplete 8. Heat factor- COP (annual) 3,4. Heat capacity - kW 8. Cooling capacity: not in use.

Ventilation
There is generous provision of fresh air in Home for Life. In the winter, the air enters via the mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery. The equipment is programmed to adapt to the ventilation needs of the rooms. The air is circulated into the ‘clean' rooms (bedrooms and living rooms) and exhausted from the utility rooms (kitchen, bathroom, laundry room). In the summer, fresh air enters through natural ventilation controlled by a sensor in the house; this ensures that the home is not ventilated more than necessary at the same time as maintaining a good indoor climate. The natural ventilation replaces the mechanical system during summer and reduces energy consumption.

The active facade
The choice of slate covering on the facade and roof reflects both the wish for durability, low CO2 impact and minimal maintenance, and the wish to integrate the dark surfaces of the solar cells, the solar panels and the windows in a sculptural composition. The wood covering and wood flooring, with their feeling of natural warmth, provide a contrast to the hardness and cold expression of the slate.

The active facade changes according to the seasons and needs. It can either be open to let in light and heat, or

Home for Life uses the energy-optimised windows of the future, with linings that transmit light deep into the rooms. The house's active facades regulate light and solar gain. The south-facing roof overhang creates shade from a high summer sun and admits light from a low winter sun. Shutters and blinds regulate solar heat and ensure privacy when needed. The size and placement of the windows have been determined by the position of the sun in the sky, seasons, energy optimisation and the needs of the residents. Furthermore, the risk of glare is avoided with screening both inside and outside.

Energy
The total energy consumption is minimised and met by renewable CO2-neutral energy generated by the building itself. After around 30 years, the surplus energy is equivalent
to the amount of energy represented by the materials from which the house is built.
A primary parameter in the energy design
is the fenestration; positioned to cater for energy technology and visual appeal, the windows optimise light, air and solar gain.

The house is managed in such a way that electricity and heat are used to a minimum. In the summer, the automatically controlled natural ventilation is used to air the rooms. During the heating season, mechanical ventilation with heat recovery is used, so the cold air can be heated without the use of additional energy. Intelligent control regulates the outdoor and indoor sun screening for optimising heat and light intake as well as switching off the light when the room is not in use.

Solar cells, solar heating and a heat pump produce electricity, hot water and room heating.About 50 % of heating requirements are met by passive solar heat from the energy-optimised windows. Natural and mechanical ventilation, as well as internal and external sun screens ensure fresh air and a com­fortable room temperature. The control system of the house reduces energy onsumption and ensures a healthy indoor climate.

Use of renewable ressources - low tech
natural cross ventilation, others
Use of renewable ressources - high tech
solar heating, photovoltaics, heating pump, energy recuperation, energy storage, other
Key Sustainability aspects
solar building integration, vernacular building strategies, accessability for disabled, renewable building materials, recycling and reuse, ecological building materials, innovative bulding materials, integrated planning process, use of innovative design tools, zero energy design, plus energy design
Sustainability rated
Other
Social and ethical responsibility

Home for Life is the result of an interdisciplinary project to synthesise the parameters of energy, comfort and visual appeal into a holistic entity, where the parameters are mutually complementary and maximise the quality of life in the home and the world around it.

Ressource efficiency and environmental impact

The total energy consumption is minimized and met by renewable CO2-neutral energy generated by the building itself. After around 30 years, the surplus energy is equivalent to the amount of energy represented by the materials from which the house is built. A primary parameter in the energy design is the fenestration; positioned to cater for energy technology and visual appeal, the windows optimise light, air and solar gain. The house is managed in such a way that electricity and heat are used to a minimum.

Economic lifecycle perfomance
  • Solar cells, solar heating and a heat pump produce electricity, hot water and room heating.
  • About 50 % of heating requirements

are met by passive solar heat from the
energy-optimised windows.

  • Natural and mechanical ventilation,

as well as internal and external sun
screens ensure fresh air and a comfortable
room temperature.

  • The control system of the house

reduces energy consumption and
ensures a healthy indoor climate.