Sustainable by design 2050

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Velux model home 2020

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Camp Wildalpen

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Sebastian El khouli

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Sebastian El khouli

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: W. Luttenberger /© Holzbox

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Sebastian El khouli

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Holzbox

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Holzbox

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Holzbox

Camp Wildalpen

Photographer: Sebastian El khouli

Camp Wildalpen
Camp Wildalpen
Camp Wildalpen
Camp Wildalpen
Architect
Holzbox ZT GmbH / Innsbruck
Engineers/Specialists
design: Erich Strolz + Ferdinand Reiter, static: JR Consult
Location
Western Europe - Austria - Wildalpen
Climate Zone
mountains
Design status
build
Date of completion
2005
Type
Housing
Site area (m²)
3654
Footprint (m²)
324
GFA (m²)
322
NFA (m²)
245
NFA/GFA
0.761
Density
0.088
Gross Volume (GV) (m³)
1020
Building Costs
500000 EUR
Building Costs / m² GFA
1552.795
Building Costs / m² NFA
2040.816
Building Costs / m³ GV
490.196
Use of renewable ressources - low tech
natural cross ventilation, use of high thermal mass
Use of renewable ressources - high tech
energy recuperation, thermal building mass activation
Key Sustainability aspects
vernacular building strategies, public spaces, renewable building materials, recycling and reuse, ecological building materials, innovative bulding materials, integrated planning process, participation of users in planning process, low cost design, use of innovative design tools
Sustainability rated
Other
Social and ethical responsibility

Camp Wildalpen is one of six youth camps currently planned and realised within the context of the LeaderPlus project. Supported by the EU and the province of Styria, the programme aims to "make a contribution to regional architecture, improve the communication climate and raise self-confidence in the "LeaderPlus" regions."

Ressource efficiency and environmental impact

The design is remarkably simple but nonetheless ingenious. On the external facades are bunks that can be enclosed within tiny rooms thanks to sliding doors, and given shelter and privacy by blinds; in the middle is an optimised core with bathrooms and a freestanding kitchen element. Because the entire depth of the building remains open and the bunks are integrated into the spatial structure, the effect is surprisingly spacious, despite its modest dimensions. This impression is furthered by the care taken over detailing and in the choice of colours and materials.

Economic lifecycle perfomance

The boxes are built in massive wood construction. They are mounted in a way that they can be dismounted in another site. The whole construction can be recycled.

Contextual performance and impact

Five modules with apartments and an element of the same size with a recreation room form a well- proportioned row of units - each around 40m2 - elegantly raised on slim supports. Apart from a concreted utility the ground remains free. Together with the stairway and seating steps this also forms the main entrance to the access balcony on the upper storey. In this way a large, covered hall is created, a welcome and useful addition to the scarce space available and also a response to the specific bankside location.